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David Lerner Associates: Retirement Plan Contribution Limits Increasing for 2013
Each year the federal government considers making inflation adjustments to the maximum amount of money that can be contributed annually to qualified retirement plans like Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and 401(k)s. The IRS announced that the annual contribution limit for IRAs would be increasing in 2013 for the first time in five years.

David Lerner Associates: Should You Take A Lump Sum Pension Offer?
Recently, some large U.S. companies have offered to buy out the pension benefits of their workers and retirees by giving them one-time, lump-sum payments instead.

David Lerner Associates: Early 401(k) Withdrawals: A Troubling Trend
When people take money out of their 401(k) plan early, not only are they paying a heavy price in penalties and taxes, but they're also potentially jeopardizing their future retirement security.

David Lerner Associates: Inherited IRAs and Bankruptcy
Since the enactment of the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act in 2005, individual retirement accounts (IRAs) have been safeguarded under federal law if you declare bankruptcy.

David Lerner Associates: Determining net worth
The initial step in the financial planning procedure must be to determine your net worth. Once you figure out your net worth, you will begin mapping out your financial future.

David Lerner Associates: Rollovers
Use this rollover guide to help you decide where you can move your retirement dollars.

David Lerner Associates: How to Resolve Retirement Income Shortfalls
Without prudent planning and a commitment to saving now to make that happen, millions of older Americans find themselves with an income shortfall.

David Lerner Associates: Retirement Planning Numbers for 2015
Every year the IRS adjusts retirement plans and IRA limits for inflation. Many of the limits eligible for a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) have gone up for 2015. Some of the key numbers for 2015 are shown here.

David Lerner Associates: Switching Professions? Take Your 401(k) and Roll It
Sometimes, you have no alternative - you need to use the funds. If so, try to minimize the tax impact. For example, if you have nontaxable after-tax contributions in your account, keep in mind that you can roll over just the taxable portion of your distribution and keep the nontaxable portion for yourself.

David Lerner Associates: Saving for Retirement
With thousands of investment possibilities and the complex rules governing retirement plans, most people don't even know where to begin.

David Lerner Associates: Financial March Madness
March is a great time to take stock of your financial situation and get your fiscal affairs in order. March 15th marks the due date for corporate tax returns, and it also marks exactly one month before personal tax returns are due. By now you should have all your 1099s, W2s, and tax documents collected and ready to go.

David Lerner Associates: How to Retire Wealthy [INFOGRAPHIC]
If you're under 40, your most valuable asset isn't youthful vigor or a full head of hair. It's time. Retirement is decades away, and contributions to a 401(k) or other retirement plan will have years to compound and grow. Even a modest contribution now will mean a lot more than a larger contribution when you're in your forties and fifties.

Generation X and Their Retirement
People in Generation X (those in their 30s and 40s) have solid reasons to be stressed out about their financial futures. Many are saddled with debt, have not saved as much as they should have for retirement, and perhaps were underemployed during recent economic downturns.

5 Ways to Fix Your Retirement Fund Shortfall
When you hit your 40s or 50s the idea of retirement (which seemed so far off in your 20s) is suddenly right around the corner. If you've reached this age and have not been diligently socking away money for retirement, there are some things you can do to fix the problem.

Millennials Most Common Money Mistakes
Although young Americans who graduated this year are better off than their older siblings, they're still feeling some effects of the Great Recession. One thing they are doing right is starting to save earlier than previous generations, but their biggest money mistakes are not saving enough and holding what they do save in cash.

Make Your Retirement Planning Count
Most Americans who are saving for their retirement have the better part of 30 years to prepare. But the average pre-retirement Baby Boomer does not have enough savings for their retirement years, and one third of Americans have no retirement savings at all.

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